A 7 page magazine article with a massive load of info

7 page article,page 2 - source: unknown 7 page article,page 3 - source: unknown 7 page article,page 4 - source: unknown 7 page article,page 5 - source: unknown 7 page article,page 6 - source: unknown 7 page article,page 7 - source: unknown

This article consists of 6 of the 7 pages of a beautiful compact story in French about Renault trucks in general. (1st page is two pictures only.) A compiled report from (no doubt) an in depth study, with an unriveled amount of facts. Unfortunatly I'm not able to find it's source. If you know, please enlighten me, so that I can credit this marvelous article. And, there must have been more articles like this in it!

The translation is for the facts only. The original lay-out and story are of course much more elaborate.


The AGT 1 with normal cabin(*2). (last sentance of the previous described truck)

With its trusty, tried 4 gearbox, double reduction bridge and front axle the straight frame is a real novelty. Steering is with worm wheel, the hydraulic brakes have mechanical assistance and the wheels are made of malleable cast iron. The initial objective, namely simplicity, appears to be achieved beyond all expectations. But that is not the only advantage of the AHR. Its design makes it particularly light. The prototype weighs 1500 kg less than conventional chassis. This has the direct consequence of increase in the same proportion the payload. Clearly, even with a payload and a motor the same power, an AHR truck carries more than traditional design. But this gain was not obtained at the expense of robustness and general faibilité, although commander Mollard, the SAET (*3) emit some doubts about declaring his demands that this new vehicles "hold good" (*4). Clearly proven by the following. The prototype receives a cargo body. A complete sheet metal flatbed and boards, because of the shortage of wood. A problem in the spring of 1940. The cargo body has rear wheel fenders and 1a canvas tarp that is almost the same level as the cabin. With its diamond shaped all steel sides, rear wings and pigtails, the sheet steel prototype of the AHR can not hide its intended military destination.
*2. AGT 1 with 2.5 t payload, then forms the top of the Renault range in this configuration.
*3. Division armament and technical studies of the (French) army.
*4. See "automobile in uniform" (François Vauvillier, Massin publishing), page 81.


The AHR gets little brothers

On February 10 1940 the prototype of the AHN leaves the Billancourt workshop. It is closely derived from the AHR but it has a four tonne payload, in stead of the five of it's bigger brother. The cabin is basically the same, although 12 centimeters smaller. The windshield is split into four parts with the top two opening. The front wings are curved. The AHN prototype differs from that of the AHR by its perforated disc wheels, that are not selected for the production series. Only the AHS will have them. Most parts are identical to those of the AHR with the exception of the front and rear axle, a simplification. The brakes are fitted with a hydraulic servo-mechanical unit. The body of the prototype AHN is also entirely metal like the AHR, it has only a side panel less. The AHN turnes out about 500 kg lighter compared to a traditional model with the same engine and payload.
Than the AHS is revealed, the last link of the range. It is a small truck with a 2.5 t payload. As with the AHN, the payload of the prototype is 500 kg higher than the previous type, which will be limited to two tonnes (* 5). The AHS looks similar to the AHR and AHN but the cab is significantly smaller. 15 cm smaller than the AHN, and with the fenders protruding outside the cab. The windshield is also four parts with the top two opening. The windshield wipers are placed on the top front above the windshield. The lower part of the front is rounded, but that will not be retained on the production model. On the latter, the cab resembles, the width aside, those of the AHN and AHR. The top sheet above the windows is considerably more curved than the AHN. The AHS receives the four cylinder gasoline engine 105x85 as mounted on the AGC models (1.5 tons), AGS (500 kg) and AFP (1000 kg) and on the Novaquatre and Vivaquatre cars. The gearbox is four-speed and rear axle has single reduction. The straight frame is new. The diskwheels from pressed sheet steel, each have two slots. The brakes are hydraulically operated without aid. The body is very similar to the other two prototypes, but it still has a side panel less than the AHN.
(*5) The military versions of highway trucks always have a payload slightly reduced compared to commercial standards (example: AGK is a five tonnes military or or six civil. AGR is a 3.5 tonnes military an a 4.5 tonnes civilian), in order to prevent premature wear of national equipment. Private owners do not have, especially at that time, such considerations!


The start of the serie production

Adapted to the needs of the French army, the AH series is far from equiping because of the defeat and difficulty starting the production. The SAET had yet ordered, March 14, 1940, six copies of AHN and six AHR to Vincennes for testing and actual use. Actualy, the German occupation troops inherit much of the examples to be produced in series. Louis Renault, who in July 1940, returns from a mission to the United States, finds a busy factory and strives to give priority to fight against a possible transfer of its production to Germany. Germans controlling the plant now, makes it impossible to prevent the production of quantities of trucks to the Wehrmacht. And with the extent quotas imposed only a small part of the production, equipped with wood gasifier is available to the French civilian market. The Renault plant itselve uses a few trucks for their own transportation.


The range

Production begins effectively in March 1941 with the AHN 1, then the range is quickly completed with the AHR 1 and AHS 2. These three production models differ from the prototypes by a number of details:
The AHS 2 series can be identified by its different front-end. As the AHN 1 and AHR 1, its shape is not completely flat but gets a slight V-shape. The grille is the same on all models and adorned with a huge diamond in stamped and painted metal. The cab of the AHS 2 is wider than that of the prototype (1.73 meter, including wings). The lower part of the front becomes an angular panel and the steering wheel gets four in stead of three spokes. The actual payload is increased to two tonnes. The last examples are delivered with artillery wheels of cast iron.
The AHN 1gets the same front but some examples are without the diamond shape. The cab, with 2.13 meters at the wings is wider than that of the prototype AHN. The wheels are cast iron. The wings are rounded. Finally, the payload is reduced to 3.5 tonnes. The AHR 1, meanwhile, receives the same cab but the length at the rear axle is 11 centimeters longer than the AHN 1. Front grille is identical to the rest of the range. The standard model receives a different rear axle, but still double reduction. The three types are available from the factory with a flatbed body with wooden boards, the effective width and effective length vary depending on model. However, from 1942, a new type flatbed appeared. These boards are stamped sheet metal and each of the panels it is composed of is decorated with a wider than high diamond. The number of diamond increases with the length of the body: they are three in number on the AHSH, four on the AHS 2 and AHNH 1, five on the AHN 1 and AHRH 1 and six on the AHR 1.


The national fuel and the H series

The AHS 2, AHN 1, and AHR 1 are equipped, as we have seen above, with a four cylinders 50 hp 85 x 105 gasoline engine, for the AHS and a six-cylinder engine of 85 x 120 providing 75 horsepower for the AHN and AHR. But, during the occupation, gasoline is the privilege of the German army. For the civilian market, all models are available initially with a Renault charcoal and woad gasifier and finally with Renault-Imbert wood installation; easily recognizable by its pre-cleaner protruding horizontally at the front of the vehicle and its gas cooling radiator arranged flat on the front grille. The gasifier equiped engines develop 35 hp respectively for the four-cylinder and 52 hp for the six-cylinder. They get a H added in their type names.


Peculiar birds

Along its series very standardized production series, the Billancourt firm considers two vehicles derived from the AH range. The first is a 6x2 derivative of the AHR 1 with ca six tonnes payload. The frame remains the same but is elongated to receive a trailing axle behind the driven axle. The prototype, which takes the name of AHZ is equipped with a gasifier because of the shortage of fuel. It's rolled out of the workshop in March 1941, and is kept by the factory to facilitate its wood supply. This stays a one off project.
The second one is also derived from an AHR 1 chassis, but this time it is a 6 x 4. It is named 210 H, it inaugurates the new numbering system that will be used after the liberation (discussed later in detail ). As the letter "H" suggests, this prototype has a Renault-Imbert gasifier with the pre-cleaner in the front overhang. The body is a Flatbed AHN 1 (or AHRH l). The rear axles are equipped with single wheels. The 210 H, which will remain as unique as the AHZ, rolls out of the workshop in March 1945. But with its covered headlights, the gasifier and its overal spartan appearance, the truck is not cheerfully accepted. It looks like the previous production from the black years 1942-1943. In any event, the AH series remains very typical of the war years, especially because of the short time of its production, that ends in February 1947. In November 1944, the AHS 2 becomes AHS 3. It's delivered to the French army and the French government and, for the first time, to civil customers. It becomes AHS 4 in March 1946 before being replaced by the new Type R 2160 Galion, but that is another story .... Meanwhile, the AHN 1 becomes AHN 2 in November l944 and AHN 3 in June 1946. From November 1944 the AHN 2 is delivered to the government, the French military and civil customers, while the AHN 3 will only be delivered to the latter. The AH will be widely used after the war for a variety of uses. Some will even be transformed into road tractors. Many users appreciate their robustness and simplicity. They are used until the sixties. Some examples have survived in excellent condition until today. We have found at least five: four AHN 1 and an AHS 2. The Foundation Marius Berliet Automobile has one of each. Many more of these Renault trucks with "the snake tail" are sleeping and awaiting their luck to be rescued by a loving amateur. (to be continued)


    

Titlepage top. September 1941. The prewar models are brought up to date. Thus, this AGK 1 receives a Renault charcoal gasifier and blackout headlights, to make it less visible from aircraft. This vehicle is equipped with an army style cabin and a cargobed with fenders. It is equipped with disk wheels, contrary to the first examples of the production that got cast steel wheels. (Photo Renault)

    


    

Titelpage, bottom. This AGOD, photographed in April 1941, is a truck from before the war (its registration is "department of Seine" from the end of 1939), which originally had a diesel engine. It's a factory prototype, that was converted and received a strange device that allows it to be operated with a gasifier. In addition to the boiler placed behind the cabin, it has a gas purifying filter that looks remarkable like compressed gas cylinders. Presumably the original four-cylinder has been replaced by a gasoline engine, more suitable to be modified to work with gas. (Photo Renault)

    


ahr proto 1939 - source Renault

    

The first truck of the AH range is presented in December 1939. The design of the cab probably did not apeal to stylists. Beauty was not its aim. The production model does not have the shape of the front and the windshield of the prototype. This is an AHR five tonnes of payload. The extra weight of 1500 kg is listed prominently on the cab by the testing bureau. (Photo Renault)

    


ahn proto feb 1940 - source Renault

    

This photo from february 10 1940 shows the prototype of the AHN, smaller brother of the AHR, with a payload of four tons that will be reduced to 3.5 tonnes on the production model. The front is still flat (hard to beat in terms of ease of manufacturing), Top sheet of the front and the wings wil change in production. The wheels will be replaced by cast steel ones with increased diameter. This photograph was taken at Billancourt, on a snowy courtyard of the factory. (Photo Renault)

    


ahs proto spring 1940 - source Renault

    

AHS the last and smallest of the range, follows the AHN shortly. It follows the lines of two other prototypes but it is significantly smaller, particularly in its width. The front and the wings evolve on the AHS 2 series. Weight gain is here 180 kg, which would convince anyone in peacetime. But the vehicle has undeniable advantages in times of war, starting with its ease of manufacture and its standardization with other models in the range. (Photo Renault)

    


ahn t prototype - source Renault

    

This tractor, direct predecessor of a series of 22 AHNH T, was constructed on a AHN prototype, which chassis was shortened extensive, since the wheelbase is just enough to take the gasifier boiler! The vehicle got an automatic coupler suitable for handling semi-trailers in the factory premises. For this use it stayed there, as it remained the property of Renault (No. 255 of the car park). It has the front of the prototype AH's, but the wings and it's cast steel wheels are that of the series production. The registration is of February 1941. {Photo Renault)

    


ahrh 1 woooden flatbed  - source Renault

    

All models of the AH series are initially equipped with this type Flatbed (with or without tarp) of wood. This example is an AHRH 1 equipped with a new type of gasifier being evaluated, as can be seen by its load of sand. Registered on August 18 1941, it carries the name of its owner: Louis Renault, Billancourt, on a plate attached to the front (lower right). The body of AHRH, like that of AHN, has five side panels. (Photo Renault)

    


shiny new ahsh 1 - source Renault

    

This shiny new Renault AHSH 1 is intended for a civilian client. Its massive gasifier takes up a quarter of length of its loading space! Small frivolity: the "Renault"-logo received some touches of bright paint. The gasifier is still a Renault type charcoal one. The body is the only one in the AH range to include only three panels. However, this new model flatbed has the sheet steel stamped with the diamonds. (Photo Renault)

    


ahs2 - source Renault

    

In the gasoline version it gets the model name AHS 2. It is photographed in the same spot at the same time. It's overal gray (wheels included) coat, tells it's coming delivery to the Wehrmacht. The German army impressed a large number Renault AH, all models, but the vast majority of gasoline configuration, as is the case here. (Photo Renault)

    


ahn 'extreme cold' - source Renault

    

This AHN is equiped for "extreme cold" and is ready to be delivered to the eastern front. It has already received its registration (WH for Wehrmacht). Flatbed bodywork in factory five side panels, this truck has no direction change indicators or position lights. To face the winter conditions it is equipped with an expansion tank coolant fixed 'on the apron. For a minimum of comfort, heating helps maintain a bearable temperature in the cabin and defrost the windshield in front of the driver through the nozzle which can be seen here. Besides the presence of a Notek night driving light there are two filling holes for cooling and an unusual "hatch" in the deck in front of the driver. (Photo Renault)

    


ahr 1 - source Renault

    

This AHR 1 is easily recognizable by its six diamond panels. The statutory markings "Eigengewicht 3700 kg" (own weight) and "Zulassige Nutzlast 5000 kg" (payload) painted on the doors, and the tire pressure on the fenders are already in place. It has directional arrows and lights. This suggests a usage limited to the French territory. Written in chalk on the side of the cab text indicates that this truck has a "non-compliant" table no. Shortages of raw materials and a tires causes comleted chassis to be stored on only four tires. The outer wheels of the rear axle being mounted without the tires. As the shortages worsened, AH's leaving the assembly chain from late 1943 where even stored on wooden blocks. (Photo Renault)

    


ahnh 1 ja 1943 truck assembly hall billancourt - source Renault

    

This photo, taken in January of 1943, in the truck assembly hall at the Billancourt factory, does not sparkel with life. It shows an AHNH 1 with Renault-Imbert wood-gasifier, recognizable by its pre-cleaner placed horizontaly protruding at the front and the radiator pressed against the front over the engine radiator. Intended for internal factory transportation, it has not been registered. On the right, in front, a Primaquatre. (Photo Renault)

    


ahz 6x2 aug 1942 - source Renault

    

Photographed in August 1942 in the courtyard of the factory, supplying logs direct from the spot, the prototype 6 x 2 designation "AHZ" build up from the same elements as the AHR 4 x 2. The chassis is simply lenghtend and equipped with an additional axle behind the drive axle. The bridge and the axle are each provided with two sets of leaf springs. The prototype was probably made from a regular AHR straight from the line because its front doors still bear, although hidden, regulatory registrations of vehicles for the Wehrmacht. Its Registered in March 1941, and bears the intern carpark number 620. (Photo Renault)

    


Prototype 210 H, march 1945 - source Renault

    

The rain does not brighten this picture. What can be said about this prototype named 210 H, that is completed in the workshop in March 1945, is that it's not very appealing! Its covered headlights and Renault-Imbert gasifier do not help. It is a 6 x 4 with two double reduction AHR 1 rear axles. (Photo Renault)

    


ahn 2 tanker - source Renault

    

May 1945, the war ends. A symbol of the beginning of the new era is this AHN 2 with bodywork other than standard tarpaulin for transport. Besides the Digard tank, this example has some interesting details: logo and headlights painted black, windshield only opens the left part, headlights mounted on the front but not integral with it. Typical of AH postwar. Turning indicators freestanding and rear wheels mounted single, pending the tires. The latter, which are the Renault brand, remind us that the facory in Billancourt manufactured almost everything himself (apart from special elements such as windows and dashboards), for the sake of maximum integration and minimum dependence to the outside. (Photo Renault)

    


RENAULT TRUCKS 1940 - 1946

Type

Years

CU

Engine

Box

Type

Bridge

Production

Delivery

AHS2

08/1941 to 03/1944

2t

4 cyl. 85x105, 50 hp at 2800 rev / min

603 S

4-speed

SD

7.985 ex.

7980 for the German army and 5 for civil customers.

AHS3

11/1944 - 06/1946

2t

4 cyl. 85x105, 50 hp at 2800 rev / min

603 S

4-speed

SD

6.235 ex.

About 40% for military and govt. French, 60% Civilian customers.

AHS4

03/1946 to 02/1947

2t

4 cyl. 85x105, 50 hp at 2800 rev / min

603 S

4-speed

SD

3.700 ex.

Civilian customers.

AHSH1

02/1942 to 07/1944

2t

4 cyl. 85x105, 35 hp at 2800 rev / min

703

4 speed

SD

347 ex.(1)

civilian customers

AHSH2

09/1944 to 09/1945

2t

4 cyl. 85x105, 35 hp at 2800 rev / min

703

4 speed

SD

275 ex.(1)

civilian customers

AHN1

03/1941 to 07/1944

3.5 t

6 cyl. 85x120, 75 hp at 2800 rev / min

622

4 speed

SD

15.610 ex.

German Army and 20 ex. various civilians.

AHN2

11/1944 - 06/1946

3.5 t

6 cyl. 85x120, 75 hp at 2800 rev / min

622

4 speed

SD

8.400 ex

French military and government and civilian customers.

AHN3

06/1946 to 01/1947

3.5 t

6 cyl. 85x120, 75 hp at 2800 rev / min

622

4 speed

SD

2.000 ex

Civilian customers.

AHNH1

05/1941 - 12/1942

3.5 t

6 cyl. 85x120, 52 hp at 2800 rev / min

622 B

4 speed

SD

271 ex.(2)

Civilian customers.

AHNH2

10/1944 - 08/1945

3.5 t

6 cyl. 85x120, 52 hp at 2800 rev / min

622 B

4 speed

SD

211 ex.(3)

Civil customers + Ministry of Agriculture.

AHNH T

1941

3.5 t

6 cyl. 85x120, 52 hp at 2800 rev / min

622 B

4 speed

SD

22 ex.

Civilian customers (T = tractor).

AHR1

04/1941 to 03/1942

5t

6 cyl. 85x120, 75 hp at 2800 rev / min

622

4 speed

DD

1445 ex.(4)

German Army + some ex. civilian customers.

AHRH1

05/1941 to 03/1944

5t

6 cyl. 85x120, 52 hp at 2800 rev / min

622 B

4 speed

DD

140 ex. (5)

Civilian customers + some requisitioned by the German Army.

AHZ

03/1941

6t

6 cyl. 85x120, 75 hp at 2800 rev / min

622 B

4 speed

DD

1 ex.

Factory

210H

03/1945

3.5 t

6 cyl. 85x120, 75 hp at 2800 rev / min

622 B

4 speed

DD(2x)

1 ex.

Factory

AGK1

1940-1941

6t.

4 cyl. 120x130, 85hp

441

4 speed

SD

AGKH1

1940-1941

6t.

4 cy1. 120x130

441

4 speed

SD

AIB1

1940-1941

10t

4 cyl. 120x130

441

5 speed

SD

SDSingle Reduction
DDDouble gearing.
1The last 20 AHSH 1 are transformed into AHSH 2.
2Recent examples were produced in early 1944.
3The last copy is produced in December I945.
4The last 10 copies out early I944.
5l40 chain falls 20 April I944.

index | | last revised: July 20 2014